1. Recombinant Proteins
  2. Receptor Proteins
  3. G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
  4. cAMP receptors

G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs), also called 7TM receptors, are the largest and most important integral membrane protein families, which mediate cellular responses to most hormones, metabolites, cytokines, and neurotransmitters, and therefore serve as “fruitful targets” for drug discovery. G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) perceive many extracellular signals and transduce them to heterotrimeric G proteins, which further transduce these signals intracellular to appropriate downstream effectors and thereby play an important role in various signaling pathways. GPCRs are categorized into six classes based on sequence and function: rhodopsin-like receptors (family A), secretin-like (family B), glutamate (family C), fungal mating pheromone receptors (Class D), cAMP receptors (Class E) and frizzled/smoothened (Class F). Classes A, B, C and F of GPCRs are found in mammalian species while Class D proteins are found only in fungi and Class E proteins are exclusive to Dictyostelium. Class E GPCRs is composed of cAMP receptors, which are known to function during distinct developmental stages and in different subsets of developing cells within multicellular aggregates in Dictyostelium.