1. Isotope-Labeled Compounds
  2. Internal Standard for Clinical Mass Spectrometry
  3. Newborn Screening

Newborn Screening

Newborn screening identifies conditions that can affect a child’s long-term health or survival. Early detection, diagnosis, and intervention can prevent death or disability and enable children to reach their full potential. There are three parts to newborn screening: blood test, hearing screening, heart screening.

Newborn Screening (534):

Cat. No. Product Name CAS No. Purity Chemical Structure
  • HY-I1124
    L-Valine-d8 35045-72-8 99.10%
    L-Valine-d8 is a deuterated form of L-Valine. L-Valine-d8 can be used in the labelled synthesis of L-valineamide-d8 intermediate[1]. L-Valine is one of 20 proteinogenic amino acids. L-Valine is an essential amino acid[2].
    L-Valine-d<sub>8</sub>
  • HY-N0215S12
    L-Phenylalanine-d5 56253-90-8 99.15%
    L-Phenylalanine-d5 is the deuterium labeled L-Phenylalanine. L-Phenylalanine ((S)-2-Amino-3-phenylpropionic acid) is an essential amino acid isolated from Escherichia coli. L-Phenylalanine is a α2δ subunit of voltage-dependent Ca+ channels antagonist with a Ki of 980 nM. L-phenylalanine is a competitive antagonist for the glycine- and glutamate-binding sites of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) (KB of 573 μM ) and non-NMDARs, respectively. L-Phenylalanine is widely used in the production of food flavors and pharmaceuticals[1][2][3][4].
    L-Phenylalanine-d<sub>5</sub>
  • HY-N0067S
    γ-Aminobutyric acid-d6 70607-85-1 99.12%
    γ-Aminobutyric acid-d6 is the deuterium labeled γ-Aminobutyric acid. γ-Aminobutyric acid (4-Aminobutyric acid) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult mammalian brain[1][2], binding to the ionotropic GABA receptors (GABAA receptors) and metabotropic receptors (GABAB receptors)[2].
    γ-Aminobutyric acid-d<sub>6</sub>
  • HY-N0623S
    L-Tryptophan-d5 62595-11-3 99.85%
    L-Tryptophan-d5 is the deuterium labeled L-Tryptophan. L-Tryptophan (Tryptophan) is an essential amino acid that is the precursor of serotonin, melatonin, and vitamin B3[1].
    L-Tryptophan-d<sub>5</sub>
  • HY-N0486S9
    L-Leucine-d3 87828-86-2 ≥98.0%
    L-Leucine-d3 is the deuterium labeled L-Leucine. L-Leucine is an essential branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), which activates the mTOR signaling pathway[1].
    L-Leucine-d<sub>3</sub>
  • HY-W010347S
    DL-Homocysteine-d4 416845-90-4 ≥98.0%
    DL-Homocysteine-d4 is the deuterium labeled DL-Homocysteine. DL-Homocysteine is a weak neurotoxin, and can affect the production of kynurenic acid in the brain[1][2].
    DL-Homocysteine-d<sub>4</sub>
  • HY-N0486S1
    L-Leucine-13C 74292-94-7 ≥98.00%
    L-Leucine-13C is the 13C-labeled L-Leucine. L-Leucine is an essential branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), which activates the mTOR signaling pathway[1].
    L-Leucine-<sup>13</sup>C
  • HY-N0455AS8
    L-Arginine-13C6,15N4 hydrochloride 202468-25-5 ≥99.0%
    L-Arginine-13C6,15N4 (hydrochloride) is the 13C- and 15N-labeled L-Arginine hydrochloride. L-Arginine hydrochloride ((S)-(+)-Arginine hydrochloride) is the nitrogen donor for synthesis of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator that is deficient during times of sickle cell crisis.
    L-Arginine-<sup>13</sup>C<sub>6</sub>,<sup>15</sup>N<sub>4</sub> hydrochloride
  • HY-N0390S9
    L-Glutamine-15N-1 59681-32-2 ≥98.0%
    L-Glutamine-15N-1 is the 15N-labeled L-Glutamine. L-Glutamine (L-Glutamic acid 5-amide) is a non-essential amino acid present abundantly throughout the body and involved in many metabolic processes. L-Glutamine provides a source of carbons for oxidation in some cells[1][2].
    L-Glutamine-<sup>15</sup>N-1
  • HY-D0187S
    L-Glutathione reduced-13C2,15N 815610-65-2 ≥99.0%
    L-Glutathione reduced-13C2,15N is the 13C- and 15N-labeled L-Glutathione reduced. L-Glutathione reduced (GSH) is an endogenous antioxidant and is capable of scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals.
    L-Glutathione reduced-<sup>13</sup>C<sub>2</sub>,<sup>15</sup>N
  • HY-N0229S3
    L-Alanine-d4 18806-29-6 99.97%
    L-Alanine-d4 is the deuterium labeled L-Alanine. L-Alanine is a non-essential amino acid, involved in sugar and acid metabolism, increases immunity, and provides energy for muscle tissue, brain, and central nervous system.
    L-Alanine-d<sub>4</sub>
  • HY-14608S7
    L-Glutamic acid-d5 2784-50-1 ≥99.0%
    L-Glutamic acid-d5 is the deuterium labeled L-Glutamic acid. L-Glutamic acid acts as an excitatory transmitter and an agonist at all subtypes of glutamate receptors (metabotropic, kainate, NMDA, and AMPA). L-Glutamic acid shows a direct activating effect on the release of DA from dopaminergic terminals.
    L-Glutamic acid-d<sub>5</sub>
  • HY-N0390S8
    L-Glutamine-15N2 204451-48-9 ≥98.0%
    L-Glutamine-15N2 is the 15N-labeled L-Glutamine. L-Glutamine (L-Glutamic acid 5-amide) is a non-essential amino acid present abundantly throughout the body and involved in many metabolic processes. L-Glutamine provides a source of carbons for oxidation in some cells[1][2].
    L-Glutamine-<sup>15</sup>N<sub>2</sub>
  • HY-N0771S3
    L-Isoleucine-d10 35045-71-7 ≥98.0%
    L-Isoleucine-d10 is the deuterium labeled L-Isoleucine. L-isoleucine is a nonpolar hydrophobic amino acid[1]. L-Isoleucine is an essential amino acid.
    L-Isoleucine-d<sub>10</sub>
  • HY-Y0337S
    L-Cysteine-13C3,15N 202406-97-1 99.9%
    L-Cysteine-13C3,15N is the 13C- and 15N-labeled L-Cysteine. L-Cysteine is a conditionally essential amino acid, which acts as a precursor for biologically active molecules such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S), glutathione and taurine. L-Cysteine suppresses ghrelin and reduces appetite in rodents and humans[1].
    L-Cysteine-<sup>13</sup>C<sub>3</sub>,<sup>15</sup>N
  • HY-N0326S7
    L-Methionine-d3 13010-53-2 99.90%
    L-Methionine-d3 is the deuterium labeled L-Methionine. L-Methionine is the L-isomer of Methionine, an essential amino acid for human development. Methionine acts as a hepatoprotectant.
    L-Methionine-d<sub>3</sub>
  • HY-N0390S5
    L-Glutamine-1-13C 159663-16-8 ≥98.0%
    L-Glutamine-1-13C is the 13C-labeled L-Glutamine. L-Glutamine (L-Glutamic acid 5-amide) is a non-essential amino acid present abundantly throughout the body and involved in many metabolic processes. L-Glutamine provides a source of carbons for oxidation in some cells[1][2].
    L-Glutamine-1-<sup>13</sup>C
  • HY-Y0252S
    L-Proline-13C5 201740-83-2 99.00%
    L-Proline-13C5 is the 13C-labeled L-Proline. L-Proline is one of the twenty amino acids used in living organisms as the building blocks of proteins.
    L-Proline-<sup>13</sup>C<sub>5</sub>
  • HY-14608S3
    L-Glutamic acid-13C5,15N 202468-31-3 ≥98.0%
    L-Glutamic acid-13C5,15N is the 13C- and 15N-labeled L-Glutamic acid. L-Glutamic acid acts as an excitatory transmitter and an agonist at all subtypes of glutamate receptors (metabotropic, kainate, NMDA, and AMPA). L-Glutamic acid shows a direct activating effect on the release of DA from dopaminergic terminals.
    L-Glutamic acid-<sup>13</sup>C<sub>5</sub>,<sup>15</sup>N
  • HY-W014423S4
    L-Histidine-d5 hydrochloride hydrate 2483831-75-8 99.63%
    L-Histidine-d5 (hydrochloride hydrate) is the deuterium labeled L-Histidine hydrochloride hydrate. L-Histidine hydrochloride hydrate (H-His-OH.HCl.H2O) is an endogenous metabolite.
    L-Histidine-d<sub>5</sub> hydrochloride hydrate