1. Anti-infection
  2. Bacterial
    Antibiotic
  3. Gastric mucin

Gastric mucin 

Cat. No.: HY-B2196
Handling Instructions

Gastric mucin is a large glycoprotein which is thought to play a major role in the protection of the gastrointestinal tract from acid, proteases, pathogenic microorganisms, and mechanical trauma.

For research use only. We do not sell to patients.

Custom Peptide Synthesis

Gastric mucin Chemical Structure

Gastric mucin Chemical Structure

CAS No. : 84082-64-4

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500 mg USD 50 In-stock
Estimated Time of Arrival: December 31
1 g USD 60 In-stock
Estimated Time of Arrival: December 31
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Based on 1 publication(s) in Google Scholar

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Description

Gastric mucin is a large glycoprotein which is thought to play a major role in the protection of the gastrointestinal tract from acid, proteases, pathogenic microorganisms, and mechanical trauma. In Vitro: Gastric mucin may be integrally involved in the mechanism of gastric mucosal injury caused by Helicobacter pylori leading to gastritis, peptic ulceration, and possibly gastric cancer[1]. Gastric mucins are classified into two types based on their histochemical properties. The first is a surface mucous cell-type mucin, secreted from the surface mucous cells. The second is found in deeper portions of the mucosa and is secreted by gland mucous cells, including mucous neck cells, cardiac gland cells, and pyloric gland cells. The unique O-glycans in gastric mucin appears to function as a natural antibiotic, protecting the host from H. pylori infection[2]. Gastric mucin may provide protection to the surface epithelium gastrointestinal tract by scavenging oxidants produced within the lumen; however, it does so at the expense of its viscoelastic properties. Both native and pronase-treated mucin effectively scavenge hydroxyl radical and that the scavenging properties are not significantly different. The effective concentration of mucin required for a 50% reduction in malondialdehyde production is 10 mg/mL for both native and pronase-treated mucin[3].

In Vitro

Gastric mucin may be integrally involved in the mechanism of gastric mucosal injury caused by Helicobacter pylori leading to gastritis, peptic ulceration, and possibly gastric cancer[1]. Gastric mucins are classified into two types based on their histochemical properties. The first is a surface mucous cell-type mucin, secreted from the surface mucous cells. The second is found in deeper portions of the mucosa and is secreted by gland mucous cells, including mucous neck cells, cardiac gland cells, and pyloric gland cells. The unique O-glycans in gastric mucin appears to function as a natural antibiotic, protecting the host from H. pylori infection[2]. Gastric mucin may provide protection to the surface epithelium gastrointestinal tract by scavenging oxidants produced within the lumen; however, it does so at the expense of its viscoelastic properties. Both native and pronase-treated mucin effectively scavenge hydroxyl radical and that the scavenging properties are not significantly different. The effective concentration of mucin required for a 50% reduction in malondialdehyde production is 10 mg/mL for both native and pronase-treated mucin[3].

MCE has not independently confirmed the accuracy of these methods. They are for reference only.

CAS No.
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Room temperature in continental US; may vary elsewhere.

Storage
Powder -80°C 2 years
-20°C 1 year
In solvent -80°C 6 months
-20°C 1 month
Solvent & Solubility
In Vitro: 

DMSO : < 1 mg/mL (insoluble or slightly soluble)

1M NaOH : < 1 mg/mL (insoluble)

H2O : < 0.1 mg/mL (insoluble)

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Keywords:

Gastric mucinBacterialAntibioticInhibitorinhibitorinhibit

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